Submarine Technology


From incredible intelligence gathering capabilities to sophisticated sensors and weapons, Navy Submarines are packed with advanced technology.



Find your future in Nuclear Engineering and Science

Australia’s commitment to acquire nuclear powered submarines for the Royal Australian Navy is opening up exciting sponsored tertiary study and career opportunities in the fields of nuclear engineering, nuclear science, and nuclear regulation and safety. Defence would like to hear from you if you are:

  • An Australian citizen
  • Tertiary qualified in engineering or science (physics) disciplines, currently studying towards these qualifications, or interested in studying in these disciplines
  • Keen to play a leading role in introducing next generation technologies for Australia
  • Seeking to join a committed and professional team working across government, academia, industry and our international partners.

Whether you want to lead a team at sea on the Navy’s first nuclear powered submarine, operate its propulsion systems, govern the regulation and safety of Australia’s nuclear propulsion technologies, or be a member of the engineering and scientific teams engaged with our partners, then this could be the opportunity for you. If you are interested in finding out more click here and we will contact you to discuss the next steps.



Step on board the Collins Class

Take a virtual tour of a workplace like no other.


World Class Capability World Class Capability

World-class capability

The Collins Class is a fast and flexible vessel, capable of fulfilling a range of maritime military tasks. With its stealth technology, whisper-quiet propulsion, powerful sensors and ability to loiter un-detected in an opponent's operating area for extended periods, it is one of the world's most capable anti-submarine and anti-ship platforms.





Jolly Roger Jolly Roger

Our Jolly Roger tradition

Following the sinking of its first enemy warship in World War 1, a submarine returned to harbour proudly flying a Jolly Roger as a cheeky 'dig' at a Naval Commander who declared that submarines were "underhand, underwater and damned un-English". The tradition continues to this day, with the flag flown each time a submarine returns home from a successful wartime patrol or an exercise involving torpedo firing practice.